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Arctic Sea Ice Extent Sets Seasonal Record
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Sep 19, 2012
Arctic Sea Ice Extent Sets Seasonal Record

The National Snow and Ice Data Center announced today that on September 16, 2012 sea ice extent dropped to 3.41 million square kilometers (1.32 million square miles). This appears to have been the lowest extent of the year. In response to the setting sun and falling temperatures, ice extent will now climb through autumn and winter. However, a shift in wind patterns or a period of late season melt could still push the ice extent lower. The minimum extent was reached three days later than the 1979 to 2000 average minimum date of September 13.

This year’s minimum was 760,000 square kilometers (293,000 square miles) below the previous record minimum extent in the satellite record, which occurred on September 18, 2007. This is an area about the size of the state of Texas. The September 2012 minimum was in turn 3.29 million square kilometers (1.27 million square miles) below the 1979 to 2000 average minimum, representing an area nearly twice the size of the state of Alaska. This year’s minimum is 18% below 2007 and 49% below the 1979 to 2000 average.

This image shows the ice extent using sea ice concentration data from the DMSP SSMI/S satellite sensor. The black area represents the daily average (median) sea ice extent over the 1979-2000 time period. Layered over top of that is the daily satellite measurements from September 16, 2012. An animation showing the sea ice extent from January through September 14, 2012 can be found here.

 
Referral:Sea Ice Data from the National Snow and Ice Data Center
Keywords:Arctic, sea ice, SSMI/S, 2012.09.19
 

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